This month marks the 100th anniversary of a lamentable event: the creation of the Federal Reserve.  My Mercatus Center colleague Hester Peirce recently addressed the House Committee on Financial Services on the Fed’s many mandates.

Over at FreeBanking, Kurt Schuler has more.

I just found this fine essay, from back in February, by Nathan Smith on Keynesian economics.  The subtitle of the essay is “It’s time to enter the inner sanctum of Keynesian theory and see what (little) it’s worth.”  (Nathan, I’m proud to say, earned his PhD in economics from George Mason University.)

Art Carden summarizes the Austrian theory of economic booms and busts.

Rick Geddes and Dimitar Nentchev explain that greater reliance on market forces would do wonders for America’s infrastructure.

Says Carpe Diem’s Mark Perry:

Nobody in the media exposes crony capitalism, the nanny state, industry cartels, and the enemies of innovation better and more frequently than John Stossel, a great friend of liberty and freedom, and a national treasure.

Clemson University’s Skip Sauer reviews, in the Independent Review, the latest book (They Play, You Pay) by my GMU Econ colleague Jim Bennett – Jim’s book being an account of how sports-stadium subsidies rip-off taxpayers, chiefly for the benefit of multimillionaires and billionaires.

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