Lotta Moberg on Special Economic Zones

by Don Boudreaux on March 28, 2017

in Books, Growth, Trade

41KfsHHyVXL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_GMU Econ alum Lotta Moberg’s excellent new book, The Political Economy of Special Economic Zones, is now out and available for purchase.

Here’s publisher Routledge’s description:

Special Economic Zones (SEZs) have become a popular development policy throughout the world over the last half a century. These zones form designated areas where governments offer businesses lower taxes, tariffs, and often lighter regulations. Generally, SEZs aim to attract investments and raise a country’s export and employment rates, but although success stories are often cited, there are numerous failed projects that have instead become burdens for their host countries.

This book examines SEZs from a political economy perspective, both to dissect the incentives of governments, zone developers, and exporters, and to uncover both the hidden costs and untapped potential of zone policies. Costs include misallocated resources, the encouragement of rent-seeking, and distraction of policy-makers from more effective reforms. However, the zones also have several unappreciated benefits. They can change the politics of a country, by generating a transition from a system of rent-seeking to one of liberalized open markets. In revealing the hidden promise of SEZs, this book shows how the SEZ model of development can succeed in the future.

Applying frameworks from various schools of political economy, this volume places SEZs in the context of their mixed past and promising future. It is essential reading for anyone with an interest in international economics, development economics, and political economy, including practitioners and consultants of SEZ policies.

And here’s my blurb for the book:

Lotta Moberg here explains, with a rare combination of sophistication and clarity, the promises and pitfalls of Special Economic Zones. Packing impressive institutional and theoretical knowledge into each page, this study is by far the best single analysis that I’ve read on SEZs. It should – it will – become an instant classic on the subject.

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