Some Links

by Don Boudreaux on March 5, 2017

in Books, Movies, Myths and Fallacies, Politics, Regulation, The Future, Work

My colleague Alex Tabarrok, spending the semester in India, raises questions about India’s home-grown raj.

George Will recommends Lionel Shriver’s novel The Mandibles.  (Be sure also to read Reason‘s excellent interview with Shriver, which is linked in Will’s column.)

And David Henderson recommends the movie East Side Sushi.

FEE deserves applause for publishing this fine excerpt on liberty versus nationalism from Ludwig von Mises’s Omnipotent Government.  A slice:

[In a truly (classically) liberal world] Natives do not enjoy rights that are denied to aliens. Governments and their servants restrict their activities to the protection of life, health, and property against fraudulent or violent aggression. They do not discriminate against foreigners. The courts are independent and effectively protect everybody against the encroachments of officialdom. Everyone is permitted to say, to write, and to print what he likes. Education is not subject to government interference. Governments are like night-watchmen whom the citizens have entrusted with the task of handling the police power. The men in office are regarded as mortal men, not as superhuman beings or as paternal authorities who have the right and duty to hold the people in tutelage. Governments do not have the power to dictate to the citizens what language they must use in their daily speech or in what language they must bring up and educate their children.

Randy Holcombe points out the irony in the anti-Trump protests.  A slice:

These protesters overwhelmingly come from the political left—the supporters of big government. It’s even better when those who have traditionally supported big government protest against the government’s exercise of power.

I’m on board with the Trump protesters, not because they are resisting Trump specifically, but because they are resisting the power of the executive branch of government.

Jason Brennan is correct: politics makes us mean and dumb.

In this short video, Johan Norberg busts the myth that the gig economy is bad for workers.


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