Some Links

by Don Boudreaux on February 23, 2018

in Environment, Innovation, Monetary Policy, Myths and Fallacies, Seen and Unseen, Trade, Work

The debut episode of Mark Levin’s show “Life, Liberty, & Levin” – which will air this Sunday evening – features an interview with my great colleague Walter Williams.

My Mercatus Center colleague Christine McDaniel describes ten things that you should know about tariffs.  A slice:

Tariffs Slow Economic Growth

– Average American tariffs fell from almost 60 percent in 1932 to under five percent in 2018.

– The International Monetary Fund has found that these types of reductions in trade barriers can “boost productivity and output,” which can, in turn, mean faster rates of economic growth.

– Economic growth in the late 19th century, while sometimes attributed to high trade barriers, actually resulted from significant population growth and accumulated capital. Tariffs during that time may have hurt growth by raising prices on capital imports.

Tim Worstall has joined in the productive fun of describing the essence of protectionists.  A slice:

A protectionist is someone who argues that you should be poorer so they can be richer.

John Cochrane writes sensibly about the prospect of truck-driving jobs being automated.

My GMU Econ colleague Larry White trusts Bitcoin more than he trusts some of its academic critics.

Mark Perry has good news about the state of forests in the U.S. and globally.

Jim Otteson discusses intellectual diversity.


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