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Greg Mankiw has questions for Donald Trump [2]:

I see you recently opened up a golf course in Scotland. I presume that part of your business plan is for some Americans to take vacations to play there. But this raises some thorny questions.

You complain constantly about American firms moving jobs overseas. But couldn’t you have opened up your golf course here in the United States? Wouldn’t that have created jobs for American caddies and groundskeepers? Should we be concerned when Americans import golfing services from your foreign course? Would you as President slap a tariff on American tourists traveling to your course, as you have proposed for goods coming from China? Do you think such a tax would Make American Golfing Great Again?

Mark Perry offers evidence that today’s generation of young American adults is the wealthiest generation of young American adults in history [3].

George Will rightly applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s McDonnell decision [4].  (Progressives and others, mostly on the political left, who bemoan this decision bemoan the fact that reality isn’t optional: it is no more possible to have politics that is free of non-kosher influence-peddling than it is to have a breakfast of eggs and bacon that is free of non-kosher swine flesh.)

Last month, my colleague Pete Boettke – drawing on work from my colleague Bryan Caplan – wisely warned against today’s current fascination with government spending as an economic elixir [5].

I join my colleague Alex Tabarrok in lamenting the fact that freedom in the world has declined for each of the past ten years [6].

Jeff Jacoby celebrates what we might call the ‘Amexit’ of 1776 – and Thomas Paine’s important role in support of Amexit’s Leave camp [7].

The remarkable Rose Wilder Lane first published this ringing essay – “Give Me Liberty” – in 1936 [8].  A slice:

But during that first century, the western world was turning toward genuine liberalism, toward releasing the individual from the grip of The State which used to be called tyranny and is now called “administrative law.” The test of strength comes now, when Europe, Asia, and many Americans have turned back from freedom and the dynamic modern world to the old static order in which individuals, no longer permitted to act freely, have no responsibility, but leave both the power and the burden to their rulers.

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