More Pontificating, Less Producing – That’s the Power of DC

by Don Boudreaux on May 11, 2011

in Seen and Unseen, Wal-Mart

Here’s a letter to the Washington Post:

Andy Shallal insists that the opening of Wal-Mart stores in the District would “water down D.C.’s character” (Letters, May 11).  He’s correct – but not for reasons he understands.

While Mr. Shallal agrees that “our most vulnerable neighborhoods, where the Wal-Mart stores are planned, are desperately underserved,” his recipe for addressing this problem is (1) call a company that consistently serves consumers well a “bully”; (2) demand that consumers not be permitted to have such a company operate in their neighborhoods; and (3) offer, as an alternative, only a parade of platitudes and hip gobbledygook (“The solution is multi-tiered and drawn from a sustainable economy: innovative businesses, better tax incentives, improved infrastructure and a more prepared workforce.”)

So, yes, Wal-Mart’s operation in D.C. would indeed “water down” that city’s characteristic tic of allowing the abstract fancies of economically illiterate elites to trump both the actual entrepreneurial doings of businesses seeking to serve consumers and the wishes of those consumers themselves.

Sincerely,
Donald J. Boudreaux

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{ 157 comments }

John V May 11, 2011 at 10:07 am

DC is an elitist paradise….for elites.

With that comes the misguided and silly ideas that constitute elitist concerns for the poor.

Michael Orlowski May 11, 2011 at 10:17 am

The rest of it is a slum(or “ghetto” , an improper term, but you get what I mean), no?

John V May 11, 2011 at 10:48 am

Areas of preparation deficiency in need of proper planning to mesh competently with the status quo local economy established by the upper class.

That sounds nicer.

Slappy McFee May 11, 2011 at 1:29 pm

Those words look like English….

Harold Cockerill May 12, 2011 at 7:03 pm

OMG Slappy, that is Washington talk. You shouldn’t even be reading it. Don’t you know what that will do to your brain?

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 9:40 pm

A thought struck me as I read the comment by whotrustedus down below in which he briefly describes the process a vendor goes through in dealing with Walmart. It is an accurate description as I can attest having been through it.

My thought is simply this, how would the American economic vista appear if we all put our individual suppliers through the same exacting process and held them to the same standard of commitment as does Walmart, and I mean the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker, the doctor, the Indian chief, the fuel provider, et. al

As everything we do in dispensing our money for goods and services puts each of us individually in the same position as Walmart in dealing with those providers, why shouldn’t we be as demanding?

Were we, as Americans, once that demanding? I think the evidence would show that we were. So what changed and why.

T Rich May 12, 2011 at 9:01 am

Vid,
I agree with the majority of your post, but to a large extent, I don’t wish to dedicate my scarce resources to that level of scrutiny on all sales. A car or home improvement, yes, but not for a steak (mmmmm, steaaakkk).

Now, I would be happy (ecstatic actually) and shocked if our government would deal with their suppliers in any way close to the way that Wal-Mart does with theirs.

Ken May 12, 2011 at 6:30 pm

vidyohs,

“Were we, as Americans, once that demanding? I think the evidence would show that we were. So what changed and why.”

Isn’t this just a response to natural economic forces? Wal Mart is very demanding on their vendors so we don’t have to be. Why vet such and such, when we know the store selling those products vet them much more than we ever would?

I’m happy to let others do that work for me. Frankly, I have better things to do with my time than vet a butcher (although if you have any in the Baltimore/DC area in Maryland, I’d appreciate it), or baker or any of the hundreds of things I purchase in the course of a month.

Regards,
Ken

vidyohs May 13, 2011 at 9:35 am

“Isn’t this just a response to natural economic forces?”

We on the righteous right would like to think so, would hope so, but it obviously is not. And….this is why it is not.

“I’m happy to let others do that work for me.”……yet I have read on this blog how you resent nanny state government trying to take care of you. Are you sure those “others” you mention are doing the job in your interest or in theirs?

I watched an entire industry move from having its billings being scrutinized diligently by private individual consumers to have virtual total laissez-faire attitudes taken towards the billing of said industry. I am of course speaking of the Health Care industry. In the 1950s I saw the majority of Americans move from private payment of medical bills to having medical insurance, and at that point those Americans quit looking at the bills and passed that responsibility on to the insurer.

Is health care the only example I can come up with? No. You can think of others yourself.

And, as I said above, Walmart and grocery shopping was not the only area in which I think a substantial percentage of Americans pay no attention and just roll with the flow.

After writing my original comment above and even before T-Rich replied, I had rethought my question and had realized I was probably in error because I began to think of all of the people I have seen over the years that do exhibit, to somewhat lesser degree, the traits of Walmart in negotiating deals and prices. But,
no Walmart does not comparison shop your plumber, your A/C installer or repair man.

You see, Ken, sir, my post was not about Walmart, but about you and I doing our due diligence faithfully in our own self interest, and in ALL our dealings.

My following on thought was that the trait has not been totally lost, and I do see many people doing their due diligence in many areas of their lives, particularly those in which they can “shop around” or use leverage to reduce the price of what they buy.

I realized that I have seen in my past, many times, people working in the same business, being paid the same wages, yet some (person A) seem to flourish and do well on their wages, others (person B) seem to always be broke and in trouble: Then I understood the difference is that A did not squander his money by buying overpriced goods and services and specifically did not buy big kid toys on impulse, and he saved religiously, while B always bought the newest and latest at any cost. A retired to a nice comfortable life with things taken care of, while B retired and immediately began looking for another job because he was living hand to mouth.

So the A people of America do use the tactics of Walmart in as much as possible, and there are many A people out there. In truth however, it seems the B people are much more numerous since the great socialist enculturation began with the industrial revolution.

Paul May 12, 2011 at 6:18 am

What is ruining local character are federal, universal building and tax codes. Supposed central planning safety, cripple accesses and other ordered/commanded/issued edicts are homogenizing buildings. Only the most upscale, financially elite can afford to fake architecture, that masks the actual structural uniformity. ( This is also why so many different cars, all look alike. Fedgov orders. All cars/buildings/citizens will be equal)

Daniel Kuehn May 11, 2011 at 10:08 am

A more prepared workforce isn’t “hip gobbledygook”, Don. It’s a serious problem facing the DC economy – probably one of the biggest problems.

I will note it’s also not a good reason to stop Wal-Mart from moving in since every time I take issue with anything people presume I’m disputing every argument in the post, which of course I’m not.

Don Boudreaux May 11, 2011 at 10:15 am

“more prepared workforce” is a platitude, Daniel (just as is “better tax incentives”). No one this side of sociopathy objects to it. But it’s not a “solution” or a plan; it offers nothing in the way of actually moving forward – unlike Wal-Mart’s actual, real-life plan to set up shop in DC neighborhoods.

Todd Henderson May 11, 2011 at 10:28 am

Don’s letters always make me smile and think. This one is no exception. As to his response to Daniel, when I worked as a consultant, one thing we did when recommending a strategy was to ask ourselves whether the opposite was also a meaningful choice; if it wasn’t, the thing we were recommending was not a strategy. In this case, saying our strategy is to have a “more prepared workforce” is, as Don says, a platitude not a strategy, as the opposite is not a meaningful choice. No one wants a less prepared workforce; the question is means, not ends.

SheetWise May 12, 2011 at 7:10 am

“No one wants a less prepared workforce;”

I’m not sure that’s true. If being educated is being prepared, I’m don’t think that’s true at all.

John V May 11, 2011 at 10:46 am

Once you actually start trying to put a plan to that platitude, Daniel, you realize that it is indeed “gobbbledgook”.

Explain what “more prepared work force” actually means in terms of a plan or policy and how it will directly improve the situations and you’ll get a zillion different ideas.

“More prepared work force” to me sounds like “A strong initiative to make improvement” or “A Great Idea”. Meaningless, feel-good words that need clear context and they don’t have it.

Daniel Kuehn May 11, 2011 at 11:44 am

Well of course you’ll get a bunch of answers. Actually opening a community college in DC (this has been a very new development) and bringing back school choice is a start.

Methinks1776 May 11, 2011 at 12:31 pm

School choice is a must, I agree. I don’t know much about this Shallal person, but if he’s like the rest of the progressives, that’s not on his list. According to them, a more prepared work force magically springs from overpaying incompetent teachers, guarding them from richly deserved unemployment and pouring more money down the holding pens euphemistically referred to as “schools” in D.C.

Don Boudreaux May 11, 2011 at 12:34 pm

Pretty much captures it, Methinks.

Seth May 11, 2011 at 12:49 pm

And keeping minimum wage high enough so folks have a tougher time getting an entry level job on which build from.

Harold Cockerill May 12, 2011 at 7:09 pm

I don’t have to worry about fixing DC as no one is asking but if they did I would say “leave me alone” and “talk to Walter Williams”.

Ike May 11, 2011 at 2:17 pm

Wal-Mart would actually be a great way of developing a workforce.

Have you seen the stats on the number of managers who come out of their entry-level pool?

Dr. John May 11, 2011 at 3:29 pm

My son is at University of Texas MBA school. He recently presented a business plan to Wal Mart in Bentonville, AR, and had a personal visit with the CFO. Many of the staffers at the home office had worked their way up through the ranks at Wal Mart and were in positions of responsibilty. How sweet!

John V May 11, 2011 at 6:03 pm

Providing more outlets to continue one’s education after a high school is but teensy step. Then there’s the question of what to do with the many for whom college will yield no worthwhile result.

I tend to be realistic about these things and realize that college is not only not the answer for some….it’s not the answer for many.

It’s nice for college-educated people like me and you to project their own views and goals on career and self improvement on all people and imagine that what would missing for us is what’s missing for them….but it’s not the right answer. Offering community college will only help the few who have aspirations related to college education. For the others, it’s a distraction….fools gold. I have career laborers who work for me. They talk about “taking classes” sometimes. I get quietly overwhelmed with pity that they believe in the value of “taking some classes” when I know they have no idea for why or for what they would be doing this. But I digress.

As for education before the idea any college is even relevant, I think Methinks nailed it quite well.

Anotherphil May 11, 2011 at 11:31 am

Prepared? Prepared for what?

There’s no such thing as “better prepared” without specifying the object of the preparation. I’m a CPA with an MBA and “better educated” than the trade-school plumber I called a month ago, but I’m still not “better prepared” to to plumbing.

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 11:39 am

Com’on Disingenuous Kuehn,

Even you can see (well, maybe not) that: “(“The solution is multi-tiered and drawn from a sustainable economy: innovative businesses, better tax incentives, improved infrastructure and a more prepared workforce.”)” can be decoded as “I have no clue as to what I am talking about, so I’ll subscribe to the “baffle them with bullshit” half of the old saw”……………you do know the old saw don’t you DK? If not, allow me……”if you can’t blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit”.

In this case, Andy Shallal, is competent to do either.

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 11:41 am

Arrrrrgh, need edit function.

correction:
In this case, Andy Shallal, is not competent to do either.

Daniel Kuehn May 11, 2011 at 11:45 am

Please don’t call me that.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 1:24 pm

Truth hurts, don’t it?

Sandre May 11, 2011 at 1:42 pm

Ken,

I don’t think Daniel is beating around the bush or circular on purpose. It is his nature.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 4:36 pm

Sandre,

I’m not sure if it matters if someone just disingenuous by nature or if they are purposefully disingenuous. It certainly isn’t better to simply have natural dis ingenuousness rather than to be purposefully so.

Regards,
Ken

Methinks1776 May 11, 2011 at 12:48 pm

Vid. Lower your weapon :)

Pierre May 11, 2011 at 12:10 pm

“A more prepared workforce” sounds like another jobs training program, paid for by taxpayers funneled to certain gov’t connected firms.

Eric Falkenstein May 11, 2011 at 10:11 am

Detroit has heroically saved their citizens from the evils of big box retailers. My comfortable suburb, meanwhile, has been oppressed by them for years.

Matt May 12, 2011 at 10:47 am

Haha nice

Michael Orlowski May 11, 2011 at 10:18 am

“Andy Shallal insists that the opening of Wal-Mart stores in the District would ‘water down D.C.’s character’”

This made me laugh

John V May 11, 2011 at 10:49 am

That means “cheapen the foppishly posh and urbane character of the city as it relates to the well-do-to and professional class.

Tom May 11, 2011 at 11:17 am

Eh…I don’t know where they are planning stores, but I can tell you that my experience with the local WalMart is that it attracts, shall we shall an interesting class of people. I am sure its part of the concern and, though this risks taboo, a valid one. Humans freely choose to associate with people like themselves and seem well justified to worry about the negative externalities.

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 11:51 am

Tom,
Your observation is true to a degree. One question though, does Walmart create those oddities of personality, or do they just shop where the price and situation suits them best?

Granting my observation that those odd characters exist sans Walmart, they must be shopping somewhere as it is, so the odd characters are there in the communities already.

Odd characters do not suddenly pop up in response to the opening of Walmarts, nor to the close proximity of a Walmart.

Isn’t it interesting that the looney left (Walmart detractors) is so insistent on suppressing equal opportunity and fraternity in shopping, while avidly promoting equal opportunity and fraternity in abortion?

Doesn’t it suggest to you that the looney left is………well, looney?

yet another Dave May 11, 2011 at 2:09 pm

You are correct that “negative externality” is sometimes used as a euphemism for bigotry.

Michael Orlowski May 11, 2011 at 2:55 pm

So by stopping Wal-mart from entering in the D.C. area those “interesting class of people” won’t shop? I find it interesting that “progressives” on the one hand love to spew their egalitarian rhetoric and yet on the other hand they love to malign people that they do not associate themselves with. Wonderful.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 4:39 pm

Who are those people, the “interesting class” to think that they can show their faces in public? I mean it’s offending Tom to have to see them. We should definitely close down Wal Marts so Tom doesn’t have to be subject to them.

People should just know their place, amaright Tom?

Tom May 11, 2011 at 4:46 pm

No Ken, that was not my point. My point is that people are free to choose NOT to associate with one and other. You have no right to tell anyone that they have to go a place populated by people they do not wish to see. You may disagree with their reasoning; however, you cannot force them to change.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 11:36 pm

Really? You commented “my experience with the local WalMart is that it attracts, shall we shall an interesting class of people. I am sure its part of the concern and, though this risks taboo, a valid one.”

Sounds like you don’t like Wal Mart because you don’t like the customers and you don’t want to see them. Well fuck you.

Peter McIlhon May 12, 2011 at 4:03 am

Oh, Ken! You are the apple of my eye!

T Rich May 12, 2011 at 9:48 am

Ken, I generally am reluctant to fire off the F-bomb; however, some jobs require the heavy artillery.

The idea that a store can’t be opened because “those” people will come to the store is just preposterous. As many have already noted, Wal-Mart does a great job of building from within. Their stores always have many times the number of job applications as they have openings. And finally, they engage in free exchange with their patrons to the benefit of both parties. Yeah, that is a company that should be demonized. Dumb asses.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 7:10 pm

Walmart has claussen pickles at the best price. I will go just for the price of pickles. Besides, how could someone who is so in tune with the study of economics not find themselves in a walmart from time time to time. It is uneconomical to not pick up some products there.

John Dewey May 11, 2011 at 8:45 pm

“an interesting class of people”? What on earth do you mean? WalMart customers are very much a cross-section of the locale in which a WalMart store is located. Many years ago WalMart customers were predominantly lower income and lower middle income. But no more. Today WalMart has moved into upper middle income suburbs with spectacular results

Randy May 12, 2011 at 12:16 am

My job takes me to many parts of the country, and I’m finding it hard to think of a place I’ve been that doesn’t have a WalMart. In the center of some major northeastern cities perhaps, but my general impression of those same cities is that they are dives… which always strikes me as funny because the people who live in these places are so proud of their “culture”… which leaves me thinking that they don’t get out much.

SheetWise May 12, 2011 at 11:11 pm

Yes … the absence of a WalMart in any heavily populated area generally means they’re not welcome.

John Dewey May 13, 2011 at 7:17 am

the absence of a WalMart in any heavily populated area generally means they’re not welcome.

Sometimes it means WalMart is not welcome by elected officials who receive campaign contributions from unions. Union workers at Kroger and Safeway are the strongest opponents of WalMart.

Craig S May 11, 2011 at 10:54 am

He says part of the solution is inovative businesses, there are few more innovative businesses than Wal-Mart.

John V May 11, 2011 at 11:24 am

He means “cool businesses” experimenting with cutting edge ideas in a professional service or “cool good” economy.

IOW, jobs that no amount of government planning is going to properly plan or….nor be of much good to the working poor.

Such business as a been a main driver of the “skills gap” and income disparity that keeps producing higher value jobs on the forefront of new business opportunities while the low-skill or unskilled jobs lag behind because they don’t produce high value.

Tongue-in-cheek: the only way to raise wages drastically at the bottom is to create of shortage of workers through genocide or plague or draft large numbers of the poor into the armed forces. ;) And yes…that’s a joke….not because it isn’t true but rather because it’s an unthinkable act with no moral justification. (preemption to any huffy-puffy readers with a penchant for contrived outrage) ;)

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 11:54 am

“He means “cool businesses” experimenting with cutting edge ideas in a professional service or “cool good” economy.”

Yes, and isn’t it odd that when we go to one such as Whole Foods Market, we always p[ay substantially more for every single item than we do at Walmart.

Give me cheap, practical, and reliable and I’ll shop there.

Peter McIlhon May 12, 2011 at 4:07 am

“Give me cheap, practical, and reliable and I’ll shop there.”

Don’t do that!!! How are we supposed to quantify which income quintile you belong in, in order to justify a class warfare argument??

Dan May 12, 2011 at 7:22 pm

Sprouts market will beat out walmart in most agricultural products. Walmart vegetables are higher priced than other supermarkets in the Phoenix area. And, the quality is usually poorer than the other supermarkets.

But, I have not yet surmised as to how Walmart makes a small community better off. Say, Strawberry, Az. All could benefit from the assumed lower pricing. But, in a small community that generates wealth from it’s weekend and summer tourism and more Importantly, it’s small-town atmosphere, most of the small local shops would likely close their doors. I had difficulty understanding why walmart even wanted to build there, when they had a store about 15 miles away.

brotio May 12, 2011 at 9:11 pm

I had difficulty understanding why walmart even wanted to build there…>/I<

I'll bet wanting to make money was at the top of their list.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 9:24 pm

Ok. That would be one. Think small town…….few thousand. Winter months is very slow. Maybe, a neighborhood market.

brotio May 12, 2011 at 11:10 pm

If the WalMart store goes under, you can tell them, “See, I told ya so”. I don’t know what the fail/success ratio is for WalMart, but I’m betting that their market research is pretty good.

vidyohs May 13, 2011 at 10:51 pm

@brotio

You had me laughing buddy, tks I needed that.

Scott G May 11, 2011 at 11:24 am

This is a good letter, but I sometimes wonder how effective these letters are. Here are some thoughts about this topic.

This letter uses shame as a device for persuading elites. It shames a group of economically illiterate elites in front of a group of economically literate individuals. An economically illiterate elite reading Don’s letter might think and feel the following: “I feel sort of stupid arguing to keep Wal-Mart out of this community when consumers seem to enjoy shopping at Wal-Mart. Maybe Don has a point?”

It’s an extremely difficult task trying to change the mind’s of these elites however. For example, an elite might next reason the following: “Wal-Mart shoppers don’t know how bad Wal-Mart is for their community though. I hate Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart WILL water down their community. All my friends hate Wal-Mart too. I’m not about to stick-up for Wal-Mart.”

If Don is lucky these elites will bounce back and forth between his letter and their reasoning. By lucky, I mean if they have enough time and motivation. Don has little control over the time an elite has to think about his letter. Don does have control over how concise his message is. A more concise message will be less costly for an elite to consider.

Don can also has some control over the motivation these elites feel to consider his message. He can try to increase shame they feel.

The two things I’d like people at this blog to consider are:
1) how does one create a more concise message (or more generally one that is less costly to consider),
2) and how does one create a message that motivates people to consider the message?

I believe “Fight of the Century” gives us some clues.

Don Boudreaux May 11, 2011 at 11:32 am

My goal isn’t to change the minds of the elites.

Scott G May 11, 2011 at 11:38 am

Bad assumption on my part. Sorry.

But, why write the letters though? Can it really be just because you enjoy writing them?

Methinks1776 May 11, 2011 at 12:51 pm

Even the Soviets understood that with enough encouragement, the great unwashed could overtake them, Scott G.

As partial evidence, I present mass slaughter and enslavement as a method of control, the strict control of information and the resulting collapse of the system when glasnost was undertaken. At no time during the unraveling of the Soviet state did the ruling elites change their itty-bitty minds about anything.

I don’t know why Don writes. I do think history offers enough evidence that changing the minds of the elites is neither necessary nor terribly important.

yet another Dave May 11, 2011 at 2:12 pm

Add not likely to the list – after all The Elites are much too intelligent, omniscient, and, er, well… elite to have their minds changed.

Ike May 11, 2011 at 2:20 pm

Don’s letters always struck me as a means of conversational preparation using simple explanations and analogies. Once you get the concept, you’ve got another way of reaching someone in an in-person setting.

Scott G May 11, 2011 at 3:46 pm

Here are my explanations for why Don writes letters.

1) He enjoys writing them.

2) He enjoys the social interaction which the letter writing brings (i.e. all the great comments which follow).

3) As a sort of therapy and reaching out to like-minded folks in response to discovering and accepting our imperfect world.

4) Not to change the minds of elites, but to educate regular folks about markets.

5) Another might be to sharpen his skills for teaching economics.

Richard Stands May 12, 2011 at 2:52 am

But, why write the letters though? Can it really be just because you enjoy writing them?

Perhaps the rewards of teaching to a classroom are similar to the rewards of teaching to the world at large.

And while I don’t know Professor Boudreaux’s motivation for writing these letters, I can tell you my motivation for reading them: They educate and entertain me. I am more informed and happier for having read them.

Thank you, Prof. B.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 3:48 am

You are a suck-up troll.

Tom May 11, 2011 at 11:45 am

From the man himself….

Scott G May 11, 2011 at 11:51 am

This reminds me of that time in Forest Gump, when Forest has run across America eight times and stops in the desert, turns around and someone in the large group jogging behind him says, “Shhh, he about to say something!”

Tom May 11, 2011 at 11:32 am

Well said but I doubt there is much to be done. Call me cynical but people are perfectly willing to live with cognitive dissonance and are not persuaded by the quality of opposing arguments. Don’s writings are preachings to the choir.

danphillips May 11, 2011 at 8:16 pm

As a member of the choir I appreciate the sermons!

Seth May 11, 2011 at 1:39 pm

Here’s an idea Scott. It helps to point out their cognitive dissonance as clearly as possible.

Andy – Why should your preferences for DC’s character prevent the poor from having more choices and lower prices? I didn’t realize you were an activist against the poor. I thought you wanted to help them.

Something similar worked on some of my progressive friends to change their mind on school vouchers. I explained that middle class and above have more educational choice because they can more easily choose to live in an area with a good school district or pay to send their kids to private. I asked them why they wanted to limit the choices of lower income folks. They couldn’t think of good reasons and suddenly thought school choice wasn’t such a bad idea.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 12:03 pm

What does Wal-Mart plan to give back to the community, or does it plan to only take from a poor community? Nobody cares what Tiffany charges for their diamonds because people with too much money on their hands buy them. But inner city Wal-Mart serves a very different clientele. What is its take on corporate social responsibility? Do they plan to allow their workers to unionize or alternatively give pay them above the going miserable rate, aka the minimum wage? What is Wal-Mart’s policy on selling products produced with slave-like sweatshop labor in foreign lands, or products that harm the environment or workers’ health? Is Wal-Mart paying it’s fair share of corporate taxes, or is it like GE paying nothing and getting away with murder? How much are the top executives of Wal-Mart getting paid in salary, benefits, and multi-million dollar pensions. How many useless billionaire Meg Whitmans are they churning out? How does the presence of an ugly big box store like Wal-Mart change the character, or sky-line of the business district where they are located? Does the community really have a voice in the decision? If Wal-Marts prices are considered low, why aren’t they lower? Exploitation must be better defined, then ameliorated then conquered. The amount of economic ignorance on this blog and in the comment’s section is truly staggering. How do you people find the time to not work, and to blather incessantly? There are economic consequences of your indolence, and ignorance. Hopefully only your children and heirs will pay the price for it, but I think the negative externalities of spewing lowbrow rubbish is much greater than that.

Emil May 11, 2011 at 12:12 pm

“What does Wal-Mart plan to give back to the community, or does it plan to only take from a poor community? ”

Why should it give anything back? It hasn’t taken anything (unless you count providing work, paying rents and increasing competition as taking).

“What is Wal-Mart’s policy on selling products produced with slave-like sweatshop labor in foreign lands, or products that harm the environment or workers’ health?”

I think the products sold by Wal-Mart are more or less the same products sold by other supermarkets as well.

“Does the community really have a voice in the decision?”

You mean besides deciding to shop there or not? If no one shops in the shop it will be closed.

“If Wal-Marts prices are considered low, why aren’t they lower?”

Say what?

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 12:20 pm

I want to know if their prices reflect their monopoly power. If they do, that is why their prices aren’t lower.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 12:49 pm

http://thewritingonthewal.net/?p=779

This website claims Wal-Mart is a monopsony, not a monopoly. This can get very technical very fast.

lamp3 May 11, 2011 at 2:40 pm

Being a monopoly does not imply that prices offered for sale are much greater than the marginal costs of those products. After all, if Walmart offers goods at substantially higher prices than the cost of those goods to be distributed, a competitor is incentivized. What I do know is that Walmart’s huge purchasing power means they can haggle prices down from their suppliers to pass that onto consumers. This smacks of efficiency, and that should be corporate responsibility enough.

In regards to paying minimum wage, I hear a lot from Walmart employees who like receiving their pay despite not having much experience. Every employee is able to scan a product to see how much the company purchased it for, its current price and inventory. Employees can setup sales on their own, and get monetary compensation for successful selling.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 4:20 pm

I agree with little that you said. I child can be “happy” living in a Skinner box if that is all they know.

kyle8 May 12, 2011 at 5:21 am

You speak like a person of experience?

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 12:27 pm

“Why should it give anything back? It hasn’t taken anything (unless you count providing work, paying rents and increasing competition as taking).”

All profits are not created equal. You can speak to a “Southern gentleman” who used African slave labor to harvest tobacco and cotton on their plantations in the nineteenth century to see what I mean.

Emil May 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm

Can you please explain to me what this has do to with Wal-Mart

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 12:55 pm

I cannot give you a lesson here on corporate social responsibility. You have to take a business ethics class or do some self-study. Usually the study begins with Milton Friedman’s infamous essay about a corporations sole duty is to maximize profits within the law. For libertarians the discussion stops there.

http://www.colorado.edu/studentgroups/libertarians/issues/friedman-soc-resp-business.html

crossofcrimson May 11, 2011 at 4:36 pm

Libertarians don’t generally believe in involuntary positive obligations as a matter of politics. This includes “profit” as a “duty” (regardless as to however misled you might be on the function of profit in an economy). The fact that you’re unable to make that distinction regarding first principles is pretty damning.

vidyohs May 11, 2011 at 9:15 pm

@crossofcrimson

Bwa ha ha ha, LOLVLT……..please tell us what one of these “involuntary positive obligations” might be as it applies to the one being involuntarily being obligated.

You’re going to force people and they are going to think it is a positive, right? Bwa ha ha ha ha, what a fool!

Sam Grove May 12, 2011 at 10:13 am

The Mao-dung hits the fan.

crossofcrimson May 12, 2011 at 4:18 pm

“Bwa ha ha ha, LOLVLT……..please tell us what one of these “involuntary positive obligations” might be as it applies to the one being involuntarily being obligated.

You’re going to force people and they are going to think it is a positive, right? Bwa ha ha ha ha, what a fool!”

I sincerely hope that you’re mocking how someone like Mao might read what I said – as opposed to not actually understanding what a positive obligation is….

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_obligations

vidyohs May 12, 2011 at 5:28 pm

@crossofcrimson,
No sir, actually I misplaced your comment in the context of the discussion and thought you were knocking libertarians because they didn’t recognize “involuntary positive obligations” (which I took to be made up gobbledegook of true muriduckian creation), hence my very negative reply to you.

Thank you clearing that up and causing me to go back and read the whole sequence. I see now that you were suggesting that our buddy “Cao Dung” believes in “involuntary positive obligations”, which suggestion I totally agree with.

Please accept my humble apology. I retract my Bwa ha(s).

crossofcrimson May 13, 2011 at 8:15 am

@vidyohs

No problem.

Mary in NW DC May 11, 2011 at 12:55 pm

No I can’t because he’s dead. Dead people make lousy conversationalists.
I can try to talk to the guy selling 12 year old girls in the human traffiking market. I can talk to the drug dealer who convinces (with not too much trouble) young men to stand on the corner to sell posion to poor people. Wal-Mart, last I checked, seems to be tons better than the head drug dealer, an employer in some of the neighborhoods where Wal-Mart is heading.
Yes, on one level people know where their low prices come from, the People’s Rep. of China. They know when they go for the lower priced made in China/Haiti/ Honduras/Thailand and not the higher priced made in the USA item, they are killing US manf. jobs. Just they same way people know everytime they hop in the car and keep the A/C at home on full blast that they are killing the planet.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 1:05 pm

I agree with you. Wal-mart has no particular interest in bringing jobs to a down-trodden community; they are their to make money. There is no automatic here. If Wal-mart could totally automate their operations they could. With the price of gas so high, I suspect the poor community would be better off having a Wal-Mart within easy reach. But, that in not the end of the discussion, unless you’re Milton Friedman. He’s dead, too, but we know what he believed.

crossofcrimson May 11, 2011 at 4:37 pm

“I agree with you. Wal-mart has no particular interest in bringing jobs to a down-trodden community; they are their to make money.”

Adam Smith is rolling in his grave….

crossofcrimson May 11, 2011 at 4:38 pm

” If Wal-mart could totally automate their operations they could.”

You mean they “would.” But if you wanted to actually be correct it would read “should.”

whotrustedus May 11, 2011 at 6:11 pm

Walmart’s low pricing is much more than the result of low cost labor from other countries. I’ve worked with them a lot. As a company, they are fanatically focused on squeezing costs out of their systems from the beginning to the end. They squeeze efficiencies into every aspect of their business. For example, a Walmart executive told me a few years ago that they sell at least 80% of their merchandise within the 90 day accounts payable window that they negotiate with all of their suppliers. So for at least 80% of their inventory, they get paid by their customers long before they have to pay their supplier. As such,. they eliminate most of the capital expense of carrying inventory. That is just one example.

Suggesting that Walmart is only able to offer low prices because they exploit low cost labor in other countries is ignoring much of why Walmart is such a well run company.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 5:47 pm

The investment of a new manufacturing plant in Honduras does not mean loss of jobs in US.

roystgnr May 11, 2011 at 1:24 pm

This is decent, but I suggest you study other parodies a bit more. You can’t just regurgitate the most scatterbrained left-wing memes, because doing so just reminds everyone that there are too many voters who actually believe this stuff non-ironically, which means that you’ve got a high bar to jump if you want your posts to be more humorous than depressing. You have to be more over-the-top about it. The username is a good start, but the prose needs work.

STATISTICULOUS May 11, 2011 at 2:46 pm

Last I checked, the average wage paid by Walmart to its employees was above the minimum wage. Anyway, why would people take the job if it was so miserable, unless they believed it would make them better off.
Both the logic and evidence are off in your entire statement. At least check your facts and think it through before you post.
Sometimes I think you’re playing a joke here-like you’re really intelligent and reasonable but are putting forth ridiculous arguments to annoy and/or amuse.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 3:46 pm

Unfortunately, people often take or have to take jobs out of necessity even if they are miserable, low-paying jobs. You should empathize with them rather with the Walton family (the heirs) who are among the richest people in the world.

STATISTICULOUS May 11, 2011 at 6:12 pm

If it’s true that they take the jobs out of neccesity, then Walmart provided them with a job they otherwise wouldn’t have. That is a better alternative than no job. If my only two options were unemployment or Walmart, I’d be saying “welcome to Walmart”. What does the world look like for those individuals without these jobs? Much worse I imagine.
I feel this way because I am empathizing, you are actually pitying not defending people who work at Walmart.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 6:02 pm

Out of necessity? Meaning, they lack the education or skills to qualify for a higher compensated position? Haven’t met too many individuals from a skilled trade , welder or mechanics, nor college graduates who are stocking shelves or at the checkout. So, if by necessity, you mean the individuals have not earned an education beyond elementary or a learned trade, then the ‘necessary’ opportunity provided by Walmart should be a god- send. Thank you Walmart, for providing jobs to individuals who, for whatever reason, did not find the motivation to transcend Poverty.
It is impossible to create or implement any social system that will have equal outcomes for all. Just as impossible is this utopian society that ends poverty, famine, and wars.
I correct myself, there is one place that you should be able to find this paradise………. Upon death and passing thru the pearly gates.

crossofcrimson May 11, 2011 at 4:29 pm

“What does Wal-Mart plan to give back to the community, or does it plan to only take from a poor community?”

I’d imagine Wal-Mart wouldn’t be too successful if the model consisted of unpaid employees taking money from lines of empty-handed customers. It’s just a guess.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 4:49 pm

Dung,

All the information for your concerns are contained in this thing called ‘price’. All of that information is aggregated through a myriad of transactions summing up to people’s over all value of all the things you mention. The fact that you ask the questions that you do simply means that you don’t like Wal Mart offering products for sale to people who can’t afford stuff like that sold at Tiffany’s.

The most offensive thing Wal Mart does is show just how effective the private sector is at providing things to poor people. Showing that the private sector is orders of magnitude better than any government agency. Government offers platitudes to the poor. Wal Mart offers them goods they can use for prices they can afford.

You ask what does Wal Mart give back to the community, as if that means something. If I build something and sell it to you, neither of us owes anybody else anything due to that transaction. This is true no matter how many things I build and to however many people to whom I choose to sell.

You ask about Wal Mart paying taxes, as if they aren’t simply following the laws put in place by congress. The problems with the tax code lie ONLY with congress.

“How do you people find the time to not work, and to blather incessantly?”

How do you find the time to not work and blather incessantly in the comments section?

Regards,
Ken

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 5:44 pm

Do your bosses know that you are playing on the computer during work hours? Where do you work, so I can turn you in for goofing off? Someone deserving is waiting for your job. I don’t think even Wal-Mart would hire a has-been like you. No wonder you arm yourself to the teeth. You are preparing to shoot your way out when the sheriff comes to evict you and put your things on the sidewalk.

Ken May 11, 2011 at 10:03 pm

Dung,

Standard reply, completely ignoring anything related to reality or answering any question I’ve posed or even attempting to marshal any sort of evidence or logical argument supporting whatever it is you believe.

However, you say regularly that you would take from me, someone who works at least 40 hours a week, constantly reads and learns to stay relevant in my job, pays my taxes, pays my bills and pays off my debt, and give all of it to people who don’t do any of those things. What do you suppose happens when you take from the productive and give to the unproductive? Also, please explain logically why what you think would happen would actually happen.

Regards,
Ken

Dan May 12, 2011 at 6:05 pm

Govt job……. I can look at porn, steal, or not show up for days and not lose my job……… Like the SEC employees or any unionized employee, I cannot and will not be fired.

kyle8 May 11, 2011 at 5:12 pm

of course since we have already established that you are an evil commie ahole who hates people, it is no wonder that you object to offering jobs and low priced products to a poor neighborhood.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 5:37 pm

Poor people would be better off with me in charge. I’d take all your money and property away from you, and I give it to them. Back to work for you, and off your mom’s computer. You’re a profane malingerer and wastrel. You can dig a Keynesian ditch and fill it back in for all I care. Maybe some rich person will provide you with the capital, i.e. a shovel, and pay you 1 cent an hour. Evil? Looking in the cracked mirror again, are you? You’re so pathetically vain.

kyle8 May 11, 2011 at 5:47 pm

you were funny at first, but don’t even rise to that level anymore. Still, even in your cast off comments you can’t he3lp but reveal your complete lack of understanding of economics, history, or uman nature, and of course, your total misanthropy.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 5:59 pm

True to an extent. I prefer you dead than any polar bear, or penguin killed because actions by scummy capitalists like you. Those animals are superior to you in every way. This is my cast off comment to a foul-mouthed dolt like you.

kyle8 May 12, 2011 at 5:22 am

thank you for reinforcing everything I just said about you. Dolt.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 3:11 pm

Penguins taste good!!

Matt May 12, 2011 at 11:08 am

Mao_Dung,

At what point did your parents kill themselves after realizing they had you?

John V May 11, 2011 at 6:08 pm

What does Wal-Mart plan to give back to the community…?”

Do you ask this of every business in every community? or just the big ones?

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 6:20 pm

I ask it of every human being. A corporation is a collection of human beings, so I ask it of every corporation as well. You don’t get to be an amoral beast just because you incorporate. Friedman didn’t get it.

John V May 11, 2011 at 6:31 pm

Yeah. Whatever.

I highly doubt you raise this issue with every business…almost all of which are incorporated. You’re just going after WalMart…nothing else. Pretty lame.

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 6:41 pm

Wrong! But, a business that is struggling probably can’t be a support to the (local) community to the extent that a highly profitable one can. I have to go, sorry.

John V May 11, 2011 at 9:41 pm

???

You’re a professional troll.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 12:22 am

???
You’re a professional troll.

danphillips May 11, 2011 at 8:30 pm

I’m curious, Mao. What do you give to your community? What do you take from your community? How would you describe your personal relationship with your community? Do you shop at Wal-Mart? Do you think you should be free to decide what to give and what to take, or do you think an entity of some sort should decide those things for you? I mean these as serious questions. I’m having a hard time figuring out what it is you are saying.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 12:27 am

Then reread what I wrote. Are you illiterate? Can’t understand it. Then maybe you will understand 15 years in prison for a billionaire fool. Fourteen felonies.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/05/11/the-verdict-on-raj-rajaratnam/

That is corporate social responsibility for you.

Randy May 12, 2011 at 12:28 am

Great questions. My guess, given MD’s total lack of respect for productive behavior, is that he is some manner of politician.

tdp May 12, 2011 at 11:27 pm

Hey Chairman Shit-for-Brains,

If you really think Milton Friedman hated poor people or loved corporations, you would benefit from dislodging your head from your posterior and going to Cato to read Johan Norberg’s fabulous study entitled “The Klein Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Polemics”.

Not Sure May 12, 2011 at 12:18 am

Walmart offers products at prices attractive to people with lower incomes, but you appear to want Walmart to go away.

Why do you hate poor people?

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 12:27 am

You can’t read either.

Not Sure May 12, 2011 at 1:08 am

Your mother wears army boots.

She probably got them at Walmart.

Peter McIlhon May 12, 2011 at 4:15 am

“How do you people find the time to not work, and to blather incessantly? There are economic consequences of your indolence, and ignorance. Hopefully only your children and heirs will pay the price for it, but I think the negative externalities of spewing lowbrow rubbish is much greater than that.”

For somebody who really hates this blog and it’s uniformed commentators, you sure visit it a lot. Perhaps you do it in order to magically change ALL of our minds about EVERYTHING. Or, more than likely, you’re just a narcissist.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 12:34 pm

If you are libertarian, you are probably the narcissistic one. Egotism and self-love, obsessive self-preoccupation are some of the defining characteristics of libertarians. Altruism, empathy, concern for the environment, community involvement, etc. has nothing to due with their antisocial psychological makeup. Just as some people are born humorless, libertarians may have a genetic defect.

crossofcrimson May 12, 2011 at 4:24 pm

Is it altruism or empathy that leads you to the path of aggression? Just curious.

tdp May 12, 2011 at 11:40 pm

Again, you completely fail to understand individualism and libertarianism. With individual rights comes individual responsibility, and no way to escape the consequences of selfishness. With collectivism comes parasitism and freeloading, not to mention collectivism is antithetical to human nature. Your ideas of “altruism” are to keep poor people from accessing quality, low-cost goods, restrict economic growth and employment opportunities, punish people for hard work, and make people dependent on the incompetent provisions of the state for their every need, a way to crush their individual worth and their dignity in order to obtain total control over their lives for your own sick gratification.

Libertarianism is designed to give the common people more control over their everyday lives, including personal, economic, and moral decisions, while socialism and communism are a means of taking power from the masses and putting it in the hands of the few “for their own good”, in reality to individuals obsessed with running others’ lives. Why else would they want such a great amount of power over total strangers? Every leftist political movement has been the handiwork of the wealthy upper middle classes (see Marx, Carl, Engels, Friedrich, Lenin, Vladimir, and Trotsky, Leon), who took advantage of the suffering of poor people and lied to them with promises of a better life.

Communist and Socialist regimes, including the one run in China by your namesake, have killed hundreds of millions, destroyed the lives of billions, triggered mass exoduses by anyone, rich or poor, who could get out, and been complete and utter failures politically and economically. You, your pathetic ideals, and your embarrassingly ignorant claims and straw man arguments carry no serious intellectual weight in any discussion among individuals who do not have fecal matter leaking out of their ears.

tdp May 12, 2011 at 11:44 pm

Sorry, Karl Marx. This post is a reply to the aptly named Mao_Dung, by the way, not cross of crimson.

W.E. Heasley May 11, 2011 at 1:35 pm

“The solution is multi-tiered and drawn from a sustainable economy: innovative businesses, better tax incentives, improved infrastructure and a more prepared workforce.” – Andy Shallal, Washington. The writer is a D.C. restaurant owner and chairman of Think Local First DC.

Apparently when you think Loco First you come up with the above quote.

Wait a darn minute! It’s a Freudian slip! Multi-tiered, sustainable, innovative, infrastructure, prepared workforce….oh, he means Wal-Mart!

ArrowSmith May 11, 2011 at 6:12 pm

Question for the blog owners – is there a plan to put in something that replaces Disqus’ email notification system. I understand why you ditched them because of the nested comment problem, but you can actually configure Disqus to only allow so many nested levels.

ArrowSmith May 11, 2011 at 6:45 pm

Mao_Dung – ask yourself why Apple uses 100% Chinese labor to build their computers and devices instead of Americans? Why are they so insanely greedy?

Mao_Dung May 11, 2011 at 7:48 pm

Who are “they.” If a Wal-Mart cashier is “insanely greedy,” I feel sorry for her, but I don’t think her greed would do her much good, or increase her salary. It would probably just eat her up.

Chris May 11, 2011 at 9:21 pm

I usually avoid ad hominem attacks, but you are retarded. Just….stop and think. How is Wal-Mart bad?By offering products at the lowest possible prices, they allow America’s poorest to enjoy a higher quality of life by making their paycheck stretch further. Do you know what Wal-Mart’s profit margin is?They had 414bn in revenue and 404 in costs. So a profit margin of %2.5? Yeah they’re just stealing from the people.

Also, what should they pay someone to stand at a door and greet somebody? 5, 10, 15, 25, 100 dollars an hour? What is “fair”? Is it fair that somebody with no skills or other job opportunities NOT get the job when WalMart is blocked from entering?

Is it fair that residents of a town will have to pay higher prices because the elitist policy makers “know better”and want to keep inefficient small stores and more expensive chains (that sell the same products)in business? Hmmm?

ArrowSmith May 12, 2011 at 1:11 am

You’re trying to appeal to Mao_Dung’s logic circuits, which appear to be non-existent. Maybe he’s in remedial training.

brotio May 12, 2011 at 2:30 am

Arrow,

Mao is doing the same sarcasm you do.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 1:53 am

You’re retarded. You didn’t read a word I wrote. Typical garbage from the peanut gallery.

Chris May 12, 2011 at 5:54 am

You didn’t read a single think I wrote. You say people need to be paid “fair” and that Walmart is “greedy” but you refuse to answer my questions, implying you don’t have answers, just emotions rooted in fallacy. Seriously, try answering the questions I’ve asked. If you can give me a straightforward answer, I will rescind my insult.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 3:07 pm

Interesting, how a third party will declare what is ‘fair’. The employee agreed to the wage walmart offered…….. Therefore, it is ‘fair’ . An ambiguous term, that ‘fair’ word is.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 3:09 pm

Did the walmart cashier give most of her earnings to others who are without? No?!?!? Then she is greedy!

Richard Stands May 12, 2011 at 2:55 am

Feeding trolls produces fat trolls that have trouble moving along.

dsylexic May 12, 2011 at 8:44 am

mao_dung is a regular commentor masquerading as a devil’s advocate/trolling for fun.some people like to take the opposite view just for fun or to sharpen the defense of their own theories. fess up mao. been there dung that?

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 12:42 pm

Think so? Then you really are dyslexic.

dsylexic May 13, 2011 at 2:53 am

aww.how can a dumbocrat not be kind to a dsylexic person.you meanie moe.

Prevalent Ichi May 12, 2011 at 9:27 am

Well, who isn’t for Andy Shalal’s plan of a greater variety of innovative retail choices, a more robust market, a better and a more educated workforce. This Iraqi did oppose the Iraq war, and he does offer us Busboys & Poets. Probably this is a crony capitalist couple of restaurants and not some new way to experience poetry while having your dishes cleared.
Plans for the many and not the few implies we don’t need a state enforced monogamy of choices, but rather can also enjoy the affections of price reducing Bill Simon and his Walmart brand. His 9000 stores have been documented to save the residents $2000 per year.
I reject the premise that DC has to pick a winner here, their best bet is to have as many businesses as possible.

Ryan Vann May 12, 2011 at 10:33 am

Is Walmart asking for subsidies in this instance?

RCP in NYC May 12, 2011 at 11:49 am

The reasons why Wal-Mart doesn’t have anything it has to “give back” have been discussed on this blog before. Despite the fact that they are not obligated to give anything back, Wal-Mart does give to a community. Every dollar a customer saves by shopping at Wal-Mart with lower prices is a dollar that customer otherwise would not have. On average, when it moves into an area, Wal-Mart causes a 13% drop in competitors prices, saving you money even when you shop elsewhere. Overall this saves consumers nationally $200 billion a year. (HT Matt Ridley) That dwarfs the largest philanthropic donation ever made, and they do it every year.

a.nonny.mous May 12, 2011 at 11:53 am

Mao_Dung= typical obama voter

This is why our civilization is coming to ruin. Because our society is so successful, absolute autistic morons like him can survive instead of being taken out by Darwinism, as he would in the state of nature.

ArrowSmith May 12, 2011 at 2:25 pm

the typical Obama voter has the shrunken brain about the size of a walnut. It’s scientifically proven.

Just the Facts May 12, 2011 at 2:11 pm

Great questions Mao. If you would do a modicum of research, they would mostly all be answered. WalMart and the Waltons do give back to communities. If you dug a bit more an pontificated a lot less, you would find these answers. You could start here: http://walmartstores.com/communitygiving/203.aspx
or here: http://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/

Like it or not, WalMart significantly improves the purchasing power of the community. Rarely can you find goods cheaper than at a WalMart. If you do, bring in the ad and they match the price. Don’t like what you bought, bring it back, no questions asked. Not bad. I don’t like the fact that the selection seems more limited. I don’t work for them, but I have plenty of experience in their stores. Not always my favorite place, but you cannot argue with the facts.

Mao_Dung May 12, 2011 at 2:45 pm

Exploitation must be better defined, then ameliorated then conquered. The amount of economic ignorance on this blog and in the comment’s section is truly staggering. How do you people find the time to not work, and to blather incessantly? There are economic consequences of your indolence, and ignorance. Hopefully only your children and heirs will pay the price for it, but I think the negative externalities of spewing lowbrow rubbish is much greater than that. You are a troll, as well.

Dan May 12, 2011 at 3:03 pm

Better defined? Labor Union leaders exploit the ignorance and emotions of their union members, from whom they steal and bribe their way into the political scene.
Labor Unions are coerced associations to which property is stolen and given to elected officials as bribes.

B.Stone May 12, 2011 at 5:55 pm

“The amount of economic ignorance on this blog and in the comment’s section is truly staggering.”
I wholeheartedly agree, thanks to you. It seems you comment on every single post with the most ridiculous statements. I genuinely hope you’re just a troll. Even muerigo looks like a scholar compared to you.

Ken May 13, 2011 at 2:38 am

Dung,

How do you find the time to blather on incessantly? You comment here as often as I see others. If these commenters not working due to the amount of comments they leave here, how little are you working? Or do you just cash welfare checks because you’re too stupid, lazy, and just generally disagreeable to be around?

Let me guess, you’re at the local library using a computer tax payers paid for because you don’t have any money to buy your own computer and internet connection. Also, it’s a nice quiet place to sleep because I’m assuming you’re just some homeless hobo too stupid to find work and pissed at the world for your own inadequacies. Does that about cover it?

Regards,
Ken

SheetWise May 12, 2011 at 11:16 pm

Note to Mao_Dung,

Did you know that some idiot is posting on Cafe Hayek using your name? Thought you might want to be aware of this.

tdp May 12, 2011 at 11:48 pm

Mao_Turd has diarrhea of the mind and is shooting jets of his liquefied cerebral excretions onto his keyboard.

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