Happy 20th Birthday, IJ!

by Don Boudreaux on November 30, 2011

in Law, Regulation, Video

Twenty years ago I had the privilege of attending a reception in DC – I think it was held at the Hay-Adams Hotel – marking the launch of something called the “Institute for Justice.”  Sounded like a good idea.  And it was to be headed by Chip Mellor and Clint Bolick – two friends whose integrity, talent, and work ethic are second-to-none.

Chip is still riding lead at IJ.  (Clint is now doing good work in Arizona.)  And I.J.’s success over the past two decades is nothing short of phenomenal.  Happy 20th birthday, IJ!

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{ 4 comments }

Jon Murphy November 30, 2011 at 12:23 pm

Having had personal involvement with IJ (they helped bail me out of a jam), I am very happy at this post!

Invisible Backhand November 30, 2011 at 12:35 pm

“IJ Litigates nationwide on behalf of individuals whose rights are being violated by government”

So, what did the government do to you at the OWS protest?

Sam Grove November 30, 2011 at 1:25 pm

You are visibly boring.

Invisible Backhand November 30, 2011 at 7:18 pm

What government did to everyone in New York City working near Zuccotti Park was impose constraints on their right to assemble freely and transport themselves freely to their jobs. Government also exposed all passersby to the threat of disease (affectionally known as “Zuccotti Lung”), caused by the OWS tantrum-throwers exposing themselves to the elements. It exposed everyone who works in the area to danger (several OWS tantrum-throwers wandered into several buildings nearby). It exposed businesses in the area to the threat of violent crime (demanding “free food” from outlets such as McDonald’s). And, in general, by allowing the OWS tantrum-throwers to encamp in Zuccotti Park — wrapping themselves in blue plastic tarps, or pitching tents — all of which required a large, constant, and expensive police presence, government went out of its way to degrade life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for those whose personal slogan is “Occupy a Desk.”

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